z
zeldathemes
Boo.
(Wheeee!) Asexual & Agender fan of Doctor Who, Tokyo Ghoul, Attack on Titan and occasionally other animes & tv shows


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pdlcomics:

The Case of the Package of the Bees

godotal:

al-grave:

Dogs carefully hunting a baby

A few years later… not so easy anymore.

godotal:

al-grave:

Dogs carefully hunting a baby

A few years later… not so easy anymore.

sixpenceee:

by artist Isaac Cordal

More information about his art here

For another art piece about the detrimental state of the future

wildeaboutoscar:

imaginedragons:

what real mens activists look like (see more here)

Just so you know, I love all of you.

amewesing:

This is so important

changingshades:

If I was into sex with dudes, I’d be into sex with Henry Rollins
taken from the abortion care website’s facebook

changingshades:

If I was into sex with dudes, I’d be into sex with Henry Rollins

taken from the abortion care website’s facebook

watershiphobbits:

If you are a man who thinks it’s funny to make misogynist jokes purely to make your female friends uncomfortable/angry, then you are a misogynist.  It is not “just a joke.”  You literally are finding humor in the discomfort and dehumanization of women.  You are not helping, you are not making satire.  You are just being misogynist.

I did things in my 30s that were ignored by the world, that could have been quickly labeled a failure. Here’s a classic example; in 1974 I did a movie called Phantom of the Paradise. Phantom of the Paradise, which was a huge flop in this country. There were only two cities in the world where it had any real success: Winnipeg, in Canada, and Paris, France. So, okay, let’s write it off as a failure. Maybe you could do that.

But all of the sudden, I’m in Mexico, and a 16-year-old boy comes up to me at a concert with an album - a Phantom of the Paradise soundtrack- and asks me to sign it. I sign it. Evidently I was nice to him and we had a nice little conversation. I don’t remember the moment, I remember signing the album (I don’t know if I think I remember or if I actually remember). But this little 14 or 16, whatever old this guy was… Well I know who the guy is now because I’m writing a musical based on Pan’s Labyrinth; it’s Guillermo del Toro.

The work that I’ve done with Daft Punk it’s totally related to them seeing Phantom of the Paradise 20 times and deciding they’re going to reach out to this 70-year-old songwriter to get involved in an album called Random Access Memories.

So, what is the lesson in that? The lesson for me is being very careful about what you label a failure in your life. Be careful about throwing something in the round file as garbage because you may find that it’s the headwaters of a relationship that you can’t even imagine it’s coming in your future.

notnadia:

ryeisenberg:

burningupasun:

eastofgallifrey:

itsfuckingdistractingohgood:

eastofgallifrey:

University Study on Sexism in Doctor Who

"Fun fact, Rose’s Bechdal test score would have been in the 80′s were it not for the episodes Moffat wrote during her run."

Guys, really, you should click the link. 

“Ironically, the woman who is often propped up as proof that Steven Moffat is, in fact, not a sexist was one of the worst in terms of the Bechdel test and overall independence of thought and character. While maintaining an average speaking time, the episodes she is in only pass the Bechdel Test 57% of the time, and she herself only passes 42% of the time. She also never passes it on her own after Series 5. It is also important to note that River’s “passes” barely scraped by this test. Her passing conversations were always around three or four lines of exchange total, limited to one per episode, and were always in the presence of/with the Doctor.”

BAM.

I’m just going to copy/paste a whole chunk of this right now:
"I think when it comes to giving women love interests in fiction, you have to let them maintain their own independence of thought. This keeps them from simply becoming a sex object or plot device. Rose (and Martha and Donna) had that in spades. While both Rose and River had their share of arguments with The Doctor, how they handled them was drastically different. Rose argued when she had moral issue with his choices, stood her ground, defended others, and overall became the moral compass of their relationship. River rarely if ever, disagreed on issues or principles. If asked to do something she disagreed with she would just yell, “I hate you,” and then do it. Her mentality toward The Doctor can be summed up with a conversation she has with Amy in series 6. The Doctor has left them with instructions Amy does not want to do, but River tells her, “We’re going to as The Doctor’s friends always do. As they’re told.” I think I just heard Rose, Martha, Donna, Romana, and Sarah Jane slap you. When it comes to River Song, it seems that audiences were fooled into thinking she was a strong female character because of her propensity toward violence, and some admittedly excellent monologues."

notnadia:

ryeisenberg:

burningupasun:

eastofgallifrey:

itsfuckingdistractingohgood:

eastofgallifrey:

University Study on Sexism in Doctor Who

"Fun fact, Rose’s Bechdal test score would have been in the 80′s were it not for the episodes Moffat wrote during her run."

Guys, really, you should click the link. 

Ironically, the woman who is often propped up as proof that Steven Moffat is, in fact, not a sexist was one of the worst in terms of the Bechdel test and overall independence of thought and character. While maintaining an average speaking time, the episodes she is in only pass the Bechdel Test 57% of the time, and she herself only passes 42% of the time. She also never passes it on her own after Series 5. It is also important to note that River’s “passes” barely scraped by this test. Her passing conversations were always around three or four lines of exchange total, limited to one per episode, and were always in the presence of/with the Doctor.”

BAM.

I’m just going to copy/paste a whole chunk of this right now:

"I think when it comes to giving women love interests in fiction, you have to let them maintain their own independence of thought. This keeps them from simply becoming a sex object or plot device. Rose (and Martha and Donna) had that in spades. While both Rose and River had their share of arguments with The Doctor, how they handled them was drastically different. Rose argued when she had moral issue with his choices, stood her ground, defended others, and overall became the moral compass of their relationship. River rarely if ever, disagreed on issues or principles. If asked to do something she disagreed with she would just yell, “I hate you,” and then do it. Her mentality toward The Doctor can be summed up with a conversation she has with Amy in series 6. The Doctor has left them with instructions Amy does not want to do, but River tells her, “We’re going to as The Doctor’s friends always do. As they’re told.” I think I just heard Rose, Martha, Donna, Romana, and Sarah Jane slap you. When it comes to River Song, it seems that audiences were fooled into thinking she was a strong female character because of her propensity toward violence, and some admittedly excellent monologues."